Recent Entries in Skeptic

After guessing the ending in The Sixth Sense 20 minutes into the film, I've been unimpressed with these ridiculous X-tian propaganda pieces, subtly disguised as films.

The Happening Review: "The Happening" Is the Biggest Intelligent Design Movie of the Year

M. Night Shyamalan's critically-panned flick The Happening is Hollywood's first blockbuster to promote the anti-evolutionary theory of intelligent design. Maybe you thought Ben Stein's ill-fated documentary Expelled was the only movie to argue in favor of the neo-Christian idea that an "intelligent designer" created the universe. Think again. With its references to "unexplained acts of nature" and a science teacher main character who calls evolution "just a theory," The Happening is basically a giant propaganda machine for intelligent design. Maybe science journalists are jizzing all over its allegedly realistic plants-attack-humans plot, but we talked to Shyamalan and we know the truth.

Avowed Christian Shyamalan told us that The Happening is really about religious faith, and explained that he chose Mark Wahlberg to play science teacher Elliot Moore because of the actor's intense belief in Jesus. Maybe he also chose vacant-eyed Zooey Deschanel to play his wife Alma because she looks like a little girl who needs a big strong monotheist in her life? No comment on that one from Shyamalan.

Am I the only one who thinks that weird psycho cult leader Yisrayl "Buffalo Bill" Hawkins sounds exactly like loveable deceased comic actor Don Knotts?

You decide:

I wasn't even going to post this, but it's important to keep a living record of these wackos. Yes, I'm looking at you.


TriStateHomepage.com - Texas Prophet Claims World Will End Tomorrow

Nuclear war will be declared either [yesterday] or [today].

At least, that's what self-proclaimed prophet Yisrayl "Buffalo Bill" Hawkins is predicting. He is the founder of the latest religious sect in Texas to make national headlines. ABC News reports Hawkins appeared recently on "20/20" to shed some light on how the world will end. His followers are standing by with hundreds of truck trailers loaded with food and water on the group's 44-acre compound in Abilene, Texas.

I haven't seen this kind of human shield action outside of a Tokyo subway groping video.

scientology_cats.jpg

Operation: Human Shield - Scientologyâ..s Latest Means of Suppressing Criticism - The Frame Problem

In the ... absolutely hilarious video, OT (Operating Thetan) level Scientologists create a human chain to block the view of other Scientologists of Tory â..Magooâ. Christman and her protest sign encouraging Scientology to stop destroying families.

Leave it to the godless Canadians to joke about this poll.

god_responds.jpg

God is Dying in Canada - The Frame Problem

Very interesting list of mythical monsters from Japan.

Seven mysterious creatures of Japan ::: Pink Tentacle

Bigfoot. The Loch Ness Monster. The Abominable Snowman. Tales of unidentified mysterious animals have long intrigued and captured the imagination of people around the world â.. and Japan is no exception. Here is a brief introduction to 7 of the island nationâ..s most notorious cryptids, complete with grainy photographs where available. Whether you regard these tales as fact or fiction, their impact on the culture where they were encountered is undeniable.

Sophmoric and full of fallacies, the Atheism article on Conservapedia has been declared (by Conservapedia, of course) the "article of the year". I'm not sure what it means, especially since we're only part way through the year, but if better articles aren't planned, it's not going to be a very good year for them.

RationalWiki has made a companion article which (often humourously) refutes the ad hominem attacks and other fallacies of the Conservapedia article.

My favourite question answered is this one:

Q. What God or gods does the atheist deny?

A. One more than the Christian does.

Conservapedia:Atheism - RationalWiki

Atheism and Immoral Views

In regards to atheism and morality, the Barna Group also found that those who hold to the worldviews of atheism or agnosticism in America were more likely, than theists in America, to look upon the following behaviors as morally acceptable: illegal drug use; excessive drinking; sexual relationships outside of marriage; abortion; cohabitating with someone of opposite sex outside of marriage; obscene language; gambling; pornography and obscene sexual behavior; and engaging in homosexuality/bisexuality. [30]

Response to Atheism and Immoral Views

The alleged immorality of many of the activities listed is debatable - Illegal drug use is illegal by definition, but that doesn't make it immoral, The same with excessive drinking - alcoholism is considered a disease by the medical community. Sexual relationships outside of marriage are not necessarily immoral. Abortion is morally difficult for some, but not for all. Cohabitating with someone of opposite sex outside of marriage is not immoral to many if not most people in this day and age. Obscene language, well, shucks, darn gee willikers, it could be in poor taste sometimes, but that does not make it immoral. Gambling: like at church bingo? Pornography and obscene sexual behavior are left open and undefined, and what counts as sexual immorality for one may be a harmless kink for another as long as it involves consenting adults. Engaging in homosexuality/bisexuality - nothing immoral about that.

Atheism and Miracles

In regards to atheism and miracles, modern scholars are divided on the issue of whether or not David Hume was an atheist.[33] With that caveat in mind, Hume is well known for arguing that it is always more probable that the testimony of a miracle is false than that the miracle occurred.[34] Christian apologists William Lane Craig, Norman Geisler, C.S. Lewis, JP Holding, and others have shown the inadequacy and unreasonableness of Hume's position regarding miracles.

Response to Atheism and Miracles

Atheists don't believe in miracles (at least, not as anything more than a metaphor for a greatly fortuitous coincidence). The point of this particular section is lost on me, personally. The assertion that disbelief in miracles is absurd because a sophomoric apologist like C. S. Lewis says so is more absurd than the assertion it is trying to refute. The atheist world view, unlike the fundamentalist Christian world view, is built on facts. Science does not accept eyewitness accounts, for good reasons, and miracles are never more than eyewitness accounts.

In England, that is.

BBC NEWS | England | London | No charges over Scientology demo

The teenager held up a sign which read, "Scientology is not a religion, it is a dangerous cult", in May outside its headquarters in the City of London.

...

A Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) spokesman said: "In consultation with the City of London Police, we were asked whether the sign was abusive or insulting.

"Our advice is that it is not abusive or insulting and there is no offensiveness (as opposed to criticism), neither in the idea expressed nor in the mode of expression."

  An anus made of chocolate

Yup, all they need is a special goatse limited edition chocolate. I can't tell if this is real or a joke.

choco_ass.jpg

But I'll bet it tastes like ass....

YesButNoButYes: PS: Raisinets Make GREAT Dingleberries

Great. One more Canadian kook with a crystal skull, riding on the media bandwagon of the new (and boring) Indiana Jones movie.

Skull 'find' inspires Indiana Jones

The late Anna Mitchell-Hedges -- a Port Colborne, Ont., orphan who was adopted by British adventurer Frederick Mitchell-Hedges in the early 1900s and died just last year at age 100 -- spent her long life retelling the tale of her chance sighting of a glinting object amid Mayan ruins in Belize.

The purported discovery spawned an enduring popular fascination with crystal skulls and their supposed mythic powers -- the perfect backdrop for the new Indy sequel, The Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, which takes its place alongside the Lost Ark, Temple of Doom and Last Crusade in the lucrative film franchise created by George Lucas, directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Harrison Ford as the swashbuckling archeologist-action hero Jones.

One missile could destroy all the satellites? Whoa. Where are Ben Affleck and Aerosmith when you need them?

Air Force's Scare-Mongering Space Ad Shoves Facts Out of the Airlock | Danger Room from Wired.com

No one expects commercials to be word-for-word accurate -- not even ads from the U.S. military. But a new Air Force commercial, about the perils of an attack in space, does more than stretch the truth, a bit. It snaps the truth into tiny little pieces, experts and former officers say -- violating the laws of physics and common sense, while flying in the face everything that's known about the world's constellation of satellites.

Well made point from the Bad Astronomy guy. Scientists and other smart people are constantly being put down in politics, and even in popular culture. The elitist scientist is the bad guy, but the streetwise and resourceful everyman is the hero.

Except in the recent film, Iron Man. In this case, the hero is a resourceful, elitist scientist, and the bad guy is the elitist corporate fatcat. Hopefully this film won't be the exception that proves the rule. Hopefully we can get back to the golden age where scientists were like movie stars.

Bad Astronomy Blog - Why do politicians hate smart people?

Let me make this clear: people are generally experts in a field for a reason. Theyâ..ve studied it. Theyâ..ve experienced it. Theyâ..ve done research, published papers, looked at the results, tried to interpret them, made predictions, done further experiments. They learn from what they experience.


Thatâ..s why theyâ..re experts.

The ADL has issued a statement on Expelled: No Intelligence Allowed. Just so we remember who these guys are:

"For 95 years, ADL has been combating anti-Semitism and bigotry of all kinds."

So, presumably, they are authorities on stuff like the Holocaust. I'd like to hear what Ben Stein has to say about this. Or maybe I don't want to know.

Anti-Evolution Film Misappropriates the Holocaust

The film Expelled: No Intelligence Allowed misappropriates the Holocaust and its imagery as a part of its political effort to discredit the scientific community which rejects so-called intelligent design theory.

Hitler did not need Darwin to devise his heinous plan to exterminate the Jewish people and Darwin and evolutionary theory cannot explain Hitler's genocidal madness.

Using the Holocaust in order to tarnish those who promote the theory of evolution is outrageous and trivializes the complex factors that led to the mass extermination of European Jewry.

It seems like they did *everything* wrong when making this film.

Yoko sues filmmakers over Imagine | Entertainment | Reuters

John Lennon's widow, Yoko Ono, and his sons are suing the filmmakers of "Expelled: No Intelligence Allowed" for using the song "Imagine" in the documentary without permission.

Lennon recorded the song in 1971 and in 2004, Rolling Stone magazine ranked it No. 3, in their 500 Greatest Songs of All Time, according to the lawsuit.

Yoko Ono, son, Sean Ono Lennon, and Julian Lennon, John Lennon's son from his first marriage, along with privately held publisher EMI Blackwood Music Inc filed suit in U.S. District Court in Manhattan seeking to bar the filmmakers and their distributors from continuing to use "Imagine" in the movie.

Christine Comer was the Director of Science for the Texas Education Agency for nine years, until she was forced to resign for failing to remain neutral on creationism.

What a bunch of jerks.

YouTube - Teacher Expelled Over Religion

This video is also found at the site expelledexposed.com, which debunks a lot of the misinformation that comes from the "Expelled" movie.

  Ben Stein: Win His Career

Whoa, how bad can it be when FOX is making fun of you?

FOXNews.com - Mariah Carey's New Album: First Review - Celebrity Gossip | Entertainment News | Arts And Entertainment

Directed by one Nathan Frankowski, "Expelled" is a sloppy, all-over-the-place, poorly made (and not just a little boring) "expose" of the scientific community. Itâ..s not very exciting. But it does show that Stein, whoâ..s carved out a career selling eye drops in commercials and amusing us on sitcoms, is either completely nuts or so avaricious that heâ..s abandoned all good sense to make a buck.

...

What the producers of this film would love, love, love is a controversy. Thatâ..s because itâ..s being marketed by the same people who brought us "The Passion of the Christ." Theyâ..re hoping someone will latch onto an anti-Semitism theme here, since thereâ..s a visit to a concentration camp and the raised idea â.. apparently typical of the intelligent design community â.. that somehow the theory of evolution is so evil that it caused the Holocaust. Alas, this is such a warped premise that no oneâ..s biting.


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